Ode to a Desk

I have a desk here at home that gets far less use than it should, not just because I’m an avid procrastinator, but because I’ve always had something of an aversion to the traditional workspace of the desk. As a kid, even though I had a particle board IKEA desk in my bedroom, I’d usually do my homework at the kitchen table or in front of the TV. And I follow the same pattern today, though, let’s be honest, I gravitate towards the couch the majority of the time. It’s a comfortable, lazy way to work, and I don’t think it serves me very well, but I still do it.

Who could blame me? I spend eight hours a day, five days a week at work, sitting at a desk with nowhere to go but the bathroom, or the kitchen, or the copy machine that jams spectacularly half the time I use it, causing me to get on my knees and fiddle with the vaguely labeled, preposterous green levers and knobs in its belly for several minutes just to get back to work, my hands covered in scratches and smears of toner.

There is something romantic about the notion of sitting down at the desk with impeccable posture and a furrowed brow to do Big And Important Work, but in practice it can feel like being stuck on a boat in the middle of nowhere, bringing back those fidgety memories of endless school lectures from which you couldn’t get up to escape. Writing at a desk is, for me, like the idea of writing on a typewriter: charming, yes, but it would get old after a while. (Not to mention the likelihood of yet more ink stains on my hands!)

Still, I’m making an effort to look and feel more professional by sitting down at this desk today, doing my taxes, of all things. (I like getting my taxes done early, and since I am in charge of getting our W-2s processed at work, I am in full control of my tax timeline. I realize this is not a normal or sane position to take, but so long as I don’t actually owe the government anything, the whole process makes me feel mature and virtuous. Which is rare in the current political climate…)

This desk is in front of a large window that looks out on our balcony, and beyond that, the tall, bare trees with their gnarled hands stretched out towards me in either supplication or some kind of threat. Through the woods I can see the traffic out on the highway, which provides a near-constant white noise like ocean waves that I rarely notice anymore unless I’m listening for it. From here I can see the paved walking trail through the woods where I am frequently dragged along by our big, eager hound dog, and, as is usually the case when I’m out with him, there is no one on it. I can’t blame them; it’s damn cold, and the air is slightly thickened by a very fine curtain of snow, so light as to be almost invisible.

With the exception perhaps of the traffic, it’s a calming scene: a typical gray afternoon in mid-winter, the kind I can only stand when observing it from the comfort of the centrally heated indoors. But even the cars out on the highway sometimes capture my imagination. It’s a lazy, cold Saturday, but traffic is constant, everyone’s headlights switched on under the impenetrable cloud cover that threatens heavier snow at any moment. I find myself idly wondering where all these people are going in such a hurry, and I’m glad I’m not one of them.

On days like this, when I really let myself sink into my office chair and observe the world from behind the keyboard, I can actually start to appreciate the ritual of sitting down to work at the writing desk. I can appreciate the significance of carving out both a time and a place for creative work, separating it physically from the drone and hum of everyday life, from the screeching of the television and the crumbs of a midday sandwich. It feels different to sit here, even if I spend just as much time zoning out and staring into space as I do from the comfort of the couch. Even when I’m idle, here at the desk it feels somehow intentional, like the gears are still whirring somewhere in the back of my head. It is a different feeling from the quiet suffocation of the desk where I spend forty unimaginative hours a week earning a paycheck.

I’m not sure what kind of spell this faux wood, prefab Swedish piece is casting over me, but I appreciate it. I think, despite my reservations, I may just keep coming back to this desk, if only to see what dedication to a dedicated workspace can inspire over time. Writing advice consistently touches on the theme of “showing up,” and perhaps that showing up is a little bit easier when you know exactly where you’re supposed to be.

Things That Have Gone On

In my true, undisciplined fashion, I have once again let this blog languish for a couple months without updates. I’d like to say I didn’t have the time, but though there has been plenty going on in my life, the truth is I have also had plenty of time to plop down a few words, and I just haven’t done it. I mean to rectify this now!

I won’t be so bold as to say I’ve made a New Year’s resolution to write regularly, as making that kind of statement seems an almost surefire road to failure. But I have, after a couple months of creative stagnation, committed myself to filling up three pages of my fancy-pants Moleskine journal every day. It’s a very modest goal, and I could do more if I chose, but I just need to get myself back into the rhythms of daily writing, even if that writing only comes in brief bursts. I’ve made no such commitment to updating this blog, but I would hope that a desire to blog more is a natural consequence of my setting pen to paper regularly.

Though I don’t use them as an excuse for letting my output dwindle, the last few months have been a little odd, for lack of a better term. Since my last posting:

  • My boyfriend and I adopted a dog, Duke. No one can agree on exactly what he is, though we suspect he is mostly Redbone Coonhound, and when we take him on walks around the apartment complex, we are frequently met with comments on how attractive he is. We feel very much like proud parents now, and are quick to forgive the animal, even after he ate an entire loaf of bread off the kitchen counter while we were away.
  • Shortly after rescuing the dog, I reached a level of frustration and anxiety that convinced me I needed to go back on antidepressants after a four-year hiatus from them. It was something I had been mulling over for a while, but I was determined to be better all on my own, determined that I had gotten past that stage in my life when I needed better living through chemistry. It got to the point, though, where I started to recognize the signs of depression that had snuck up on me all through my adolescence and into my twenties, which five years ago transformed into a perfect storm in which I had a total breakdown at work for no reason at all and finally decided to go to therapy the next day. My mental state had not gotten quite that bad this time around, but I could see the worst coming, and decided to head it off at the pass by reluctantly going back on medication. And regardless of what the skeptics say, it very much helps me. The feelings of panic and despair that so often ate away at me during normal daily activities has subsided, and I feel much more clearheaded and ready to take on whatever challenges lie ahead. I am far from perfect, but I am much better.
  • Meanwhile, my dad officially started to come out to people as a transgender woman. This has been common knowledge in my family for several years now, since my parents’ divorce (which was precipitated by my dad’s newfound commitment to his true identity). There are a lot of things I could say about this, but at present I’m not confident enough to put any of my thoughts together in a coherent fashion. All I can say is that I’m glad my dad finally feels comfortable enough to be who he truly feels he is, and at the very least I am grateful that my parents, though separated, can still get along quite well, spending holidays together and quietly commiserating over their delightful children.
  • Four months after moving in together, the week before Christmas, my boyfriend and I moved yet again, to a different unit in the same apartment complex. If possible, it was a more harrowing experience than the first time we moved, from two separate apartments miles apart on the hottest day of the year. The distance moved was smaller, but it seemed greater, as we moved from a second floor walkup to a third floor walkup in a different building, this time with a 72-pound dog in tow. Despite the aggravation of the experience, though, it was a worthwhile change, as our upstairs neighbor in our previous apartment had the infuriating habit of stomping back and forth across his apartment for hours at a time like some kind of power-walking Frankenstein monster. To this day we’re not sure what the guy was doing, but to give some context, when we were almost done moving out, our downstairs neighbor appeared shocked, having no idea that we had been moving over several days. At the same time, our upstairs neighbor made enough noise that we thought for sure he was moving out, though that was hardly the case. We are now on the top floor and much happier, more relaxed people because of it.

Other things happened in this period, obviously. I went to NerdCon: Stories (perhaps the last one ever?). I got a significant raise at work that makes escaping my office job any time soon seem much less reasonable. I have deleted all the games off my phone and committed myself, along with writing more, to reading more this year instead of idly poking at Candy Crush. I am currently almost finished with Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, which despite its intimidating size is an engaging, fantastical read.

Looking back, there has been no real lack of activity in my life lately, though I do keep waiting for something else to happen. I’m not sure what I’m waiting for, but I’m frequently keeping an eye out for the next thing, the next step in my life, whatever that may be.

I’m looking back on this blog post and thinking to myself that it’s sloppy and not particularly engaging or well-written, but part of my commitment to writing more requires not overthinking what I do write. The practice is worth a lot, even if the execution isn’t the best. (At least until the execution really does matter and there’s a six-figure advance in the balance. But that’s not going to be on the table for quite a while, if ever.)

So I will remain sloppy for the time being. Sloppy and searching, and hopefully learning a few things as 2017 progresses. Here’s to the process, whatever form it takes!